Reaction to the "Cafe Q" in the LGBT Center - An Event Essay

Reaction to the "Cafe Q" in the LGBT Center - An Event Essay

I went to an event called "Cafe Q" in a coffeehouse supported by the LGBT Center at our campus. Plenty of showcases were presented after the leader announced the topic that day: celebrating the arrival of autumn. They were about singing, playing, and poems, interweaving with discussion about harvest and appreciation. Also, the members and the volunteers of the LGBT center were organized as a community sharing experience and ideas concerning about the LGBT issues, and a number of students who were outside of the community got involved. They were discussing about their own life experience, like how the levels of discrimination against them were diminishing, though they still existed, and how their family and friends treated them as equal as everyone: these made them proud and feel happy to be themselves. It finally turned out to be a magic house where enjoyable public affects or feelings occurred and permeated through everyone who attended. As an international students, I always turn to think from an international perspective, so I tried to compare the situation in America with that of in my own country. A question created in my mind: is there a possibility for China to organize such a community or event in public?

In China, I have never heart such community like the LGBT Center in colleges. It does not mean, however, that we do not have an organization which supports and advocates LGBT human rights. The fact is that seldom have these issues been discussed and reported in public or media. We do have a few scholars who contribute themselves to the LGBT studies, and Yinhe Li is one of them. She have submitted a set of bills supporting gay and lesbian marriage in China to the government for a couple of times; unfortunately, there were all refused. A number of reasons are involved, political hegemony is one of them. To a certain extent, China is a country with no actual political democracy, which in turn, makes media diversity impossible. Thus, numerous outlets and minority voices are prevented from the public. As a result, the topics concerning about the LGBT issues are presented as a cultural taboo in China: unusual, strange, and dangerous to the public. Therefore, Chinese people are still far from seeing any way to provide for the possibility of the legalization of gay and lesbian marriage, despite of the fact that more tolerance is presented by China.

Realizing the above fact that gay marriage is still far from China, I tried to discover the deeper reasons hidden behind it. In China, filial piety has been considered as an extremely essential principle and virtue for centuries. Also, there is a traditional view that three forms of unfilial conducts should be precluded, the worst of which is to sever the family line, having no descendants. Thus, those who have a sexual orientation to the people of the same sex bind themselves to the traditional moral principle: they force themselves to build a family with those they regard with no affections and give birth to children as the society requires. What is more, this principle is still been performed in most rural areas in China, even in some modern cities. It is hard for Chinese people to get rid of this principle deeply rooted in Chinese culture which is famous for its Confucian philosophy.

Therefore, what can probably be claimed with more justification is: it is the social and cultural background that restrict guys and lesbians to be themselves. Without an open, equal, and tolerant society and culture, it is unpractical to make a law authorizing gay marriages. In other words, putting gay or lesbian marriages into practice regardless of its society background is equal with forcing those people to commit suicide in that society.