Mexican Immigrants in the U.S

Mexican Immigrants in the U.S

Mexicans have a huge part in making up the population for Chicago today. The first few numbers of the Mexican immigration came in during the early 1900s, closer to 1910. They came for a few reasons, but mainly, they came because of the poor economic times during the Mexican Revolution during these times. This state of their departure doesn't really differ for the same reasons on why a lot of the mexican population leave their nation today. As they made their journey's over, they came with dreams of working in huge factories, which during these times, the industrial world was booming with business. When they arrived however, they were not put in industry work. They lacked experience and were therefore, put to work in the agricultural field. To this day, Mexican people are known for their work in this field. The early 1900s were somewhat rough for the mexican people who came for "A better life". One of these difficulties was finding homes for themselves.

In Mexico, it's common for families to have a high number of children. The parents do this mainly for one reason. Once the children begin to grow up, they start to work and help out the family financially. Having many kids in one family however, can cause a hazard at times for the health of the rest of the family. With bills piling up, financial needs became scarce within communities. Some families weren't able to pay for food, shelter, clothing, and even medical help. Mainly, conditions for homes were very poor because of the fact that many people would live in the same apartment together. People did this so that the cost of the rent was not as expensive. The housing market during the 20th century was mainly under the owning of other immigrant groups. For that reason, rent was put at a higher cost for Mexicans. So, going to back to the fact that multiple families lived in the same compound, many sicknesses and health/sanitation problems began to occur.

Another job that Mexicans worked in was the railroad industries. They were known as "traqueros". As for homes for themselves, they lived in boxcars and were very mobile because of their job. Soon jobs began to spread and "colonias" formed.

Colonias, which were known as Mexican residential enclaves, soon began to spread around the Chicago land areas. From the south side, up to the northwest side of town, these colonias were on the rise. They began to live in intertwined communities with Poles and Italian immigrants. There jobs also spread and they had a bigger variety to come choose from. Education was not exactly in the picture at the time, but that's a separate deal from this. Men were becoming barber's, local pool bars, and settlement houses. As women began to come over to, a new industry arose. The industry which began to make the famous dish known for mexican's, which is the tortilla. The tortilla industry took off from there and many mexican restaurants also opened up. People began writing spanish newspapers also for the community to become informed with current events. As the 20s passed by, the Mexican voice was beginning to be heard and more things were getting done by the people. They started fraternities and mutual benefit societies. They began to raise money, and soon were able to send money and other aid back to Mexico. (An interesting point I found was how they would raise money to send back the deceased people who wished to be buried back in their home land.)