How the Allied Nations Were Able to Win World War II

How the Allied Nations Were Able to Win World War II

The Allied Nations were able to defeat the Axis powers through four important factors: superior technology, superior industrial production, superior coordination, and moral superiority. (Commentary 7) The three major Allies were: Great Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union. The Axis powers were: Germany, Italy, and Japan. (Duiker – 137, 138)

“Superior technology was possible because the United States, the Soviet Union, and Great Britain mass-produced large quantities of tanks and airplanes. Meanwhile, Germany produced many different types of vehicles, but not in large quantities. Thus, it was easy to train Allied mechanics to maintain their vehicles, but difficult for Germans to maintain their vehicles efficiently.” (Commentary 7)

The Allied Nations used superior industrial production to their advantage during the war and significantly produced more aircraft and tanks than Germany. “The United States focused on applying the techniques of mass production to armaments. For its part, the Soviet Union simply compelled its people to work long hours making masses of crude weapons. Perhaps more critical, the Germans simply could not produce enough petroleum to fuel their tanks and airplanes.”

Superior coordination of the Allied Nations was an advantage in World War 2. The Allies were able to limit the advancement of conquering countries by the Axis powers. The Axis Powers were outnumbered and out thought. While the Allies were investing more and more troops into the war, the Axis were losing ground and resources very quickly. The Germans were virtually surrounded in Europe and blockaded by the British, and the Russians coming in from the east killing 75% of the German army in the war. The Allies were trying to rebuild the nations which had suffered destruction by Germany. The Axis powers lost because Hitler was more concerned with expanding his empire, than securing the lands he controlled from invasion by the Allied Nations. (Duiker – 137, 138, 139) Moral superiority was important because Allied nations relied upon nationalist feelings to win support for their war effort. (Commentary 7)