Theatre and Plays

Euripide's - The Bacchae

Euripide's - The Bacchae

In Euripide’s tragedy The Bacchae we cannot find the prototype of Aristotle’s tragic hero: none of the main characters (Cadmus, Agave, Pentheus) fits perfectly in the pattern that the Greek philosopher theorized in his Poetics; in each one of them, as a matter of fact, we can find some of the characteristics of the classic tragic hero.

How William Shakespeare Developed Evil, Violence and Death in the Play Macbeth

How William Shakespeare Developed Evil, Violence and Death in the Play Macbeth

In William Shakespeare life, he wrote many tragedies. Shakespeare didn’t leave anything behind so every one that reads any of his plays then you would have to guess what he was thinking. He uses evil, violence, and death in all of his plays, so I found out that in William Shakespeare play, Macbeth has evil, violence, and death.

The Ties That Bind: A Critical Analysis of Wilson’s Fences

The Ties That Bind: A Critical Analysis of Wilson’s Fences

What defines social existence? Some individual achievements are measured by surpassing goals or gaining financial stability. An attractive career can magnify personal independence but greatness cultivates through interaction, learning and relationships. Developing into adults and leading humanities future are today’s youth. Parental guidance requires intentional care for any strong social background and for teaching children as they grow through adolescents. But what if those innocent moments are distorted, corrupted, or taken away? What if a child witnesses the cruel punishment of a wretched father who brutally beat their son and raped their girlfriend? In Fences, written by August Wilson, the ugly side of Troy’s upbringing is shown throughout the play to bring light upon the personal struggles of Troy and the consequences it has on his family. Troy is a man with passion, who wants to lead his family, but Troy lacks the tools to focus his energies into a completely positive atmosphere; this result in Troy’s family displays a unique insight into the life and personality of Troy Maxson.

Migrating to the North - Paper on the Play 'A Raisan in the Sun' by Lorraine Hansberry: The Harsh Laws Known as the Jim Crow Laws that African Americans Faced in the 19th and 20th Century

Migrating to the North - Paper on the Play 'A Raisan in the Sun' by Lorraine Hansberry: The Harsh Laws Known as the Jim Crow Laws that African Americans Faced in the 19th and 20th Century

During the late 19th century to the middle of the 20th century, many African-Americans were subject to harsh laws known as the Jim Crow laws. These laws limited if not segregated African-Americans entirely from people who are of white background; considering Africa-Americans as second class citizens within the Southern States. As a result, many families migrated to the North, where African-Americans found some of the liberties as their white brethren but still considered as an outsider in total equity. In her play, “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry, she gives an example of the life style most African-Americans endured once they had traveled to the north.

The Miracle Worker - How the Characters Change by the End of the Play

The Miracle Worker - How the Characters Change by the End of the Play

“The characters undergo profound changes by the end of the play.”

Can people change? The characters in “The Miracle Worker” play are all very different. They all have different qualities and appearances. They all change and evolve during this play. As you probably know it is a true story and it is taken place in the 1880’s. Annie grew up in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Most of the play takes place at the Keller’s house, also briefly, the Perkins Institution for the blind, in Boston. Although people change a lot throughout the play, Annie, James, and Helen change the most.

Discussing Saki and his Writing Styles as seen in the Short Stories Filboid Studge, the Story of a Mouse That Helped and The Interlopers

Discussing Saki and his Writing Styles as seen in the Short Stories Filboid Studge, the Story of a Mouse That Helped and The Interlopers

Saki, the author of the short stories Filboid Studge, the Story of a Mouse That Helped and The Interlopers, uses many different ways to portray the same ideas. Saki’s short stories have many similarities in their theme and writing styles. For example, Saki is known for torturing his characters, ending the story with an ironic twist that not many readers expect. He also uses different literary terms to show his different ideas about life. In these two short stories, Saki uses irony, imagery, and different settings and moods for each one. Though they are different, Saki’s intent and purpose is similar.

Comparative Essay on the Characters Nick Bottom and Puck from William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Comparative Essay on the Characters Nick Bottom and Puck from William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

In William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, two of the most important characters by the name of Nick Bottom and Puck have many things in common such as their light-hearted nature and the way they behave throughout. However, they also have their differences. Puck is known to be a fairy, considered to be of a higher status whereas Bottom is a craftsman, by no means greater than the Athenian citizens. While Puck is responsible for all the mischief and deception throughout the entire play, Bottom ironically, was the one who was turned into an ass by Puck. Although they seem to be so similar yet contradict each other, they have given the audience a complete fresh view about the surreal world of dreams and visions.

Bottom’s soliloquy and Puck’s monologue are both similar in the fact that both speeches include images of sleeping, dreaming and visions.
Bottom: “God’s my life! Stolen hence, and left me asleep! I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream.” IV, i, 203-205

Evidence of Madness in Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Evidence of Madness in Hamlet by William Shakespeare

The evidence of madness first appeared in act one scene one line 32, it says, “that if again this apparition come/ He may approve our eyes and speak to it.” The emergence of an apparition suggests that this play will deal with unusual events. Since in the real world people denied the exits of ghosts, the readers will have a chance to make a guess between “is the character mad?” and “is this a play about ghost?”

How Pace is Manipulated in Oh What a Lovely War - The Purpose and Impact of These Techniques on the Play

How Pace is Manipulated in Oh What a Lovely War - The Purpose and Impact of These Techniques on the Play

How fast or slow a play is affects how the audience perceives it, the same scene performed at two different speeds can have a completely different impact on the play so it is important that the pace of a scene complements its tone. Maintaining the same pace for a long period of time however can make for a boring play and so manipulating the pace is important, but how often and how quickly you do this can itself make a statement. In this essay I plan to show how pace was successfully manipulated in ‘Oh What a Lovely War’.

Paper on the Suggestion that Character Desdemona From Othello Suffers at the Hands of a Patriarchal, Male Dominated Society. Or is She a Temptress?

Paper on the Suggestion that Character Desdemona From Othello Suffers at the Hands of a Patriarchal, Male Dominated Society. Or is She a Temptress?

Desdemona is one of the most important characters in ‘Othello,’ not because of what she has done, but what she hasn’t. The simple fact of Desdemona’s innocence from the supposed ‘crime’ (5.2.26) she committed provides a compelling argument for her position as a ‘victim’ of a patriarchal society – she is punished symbolically, when Othello ‘smothers her voice’ according to Ania Loomba, the loss of her voice demonstrating the devastating, inevitable effects of simply being a woman in a man’s society. Certain scenes give the impression of Desdemona playing the ‘strumpet’ with Iago and Cassio, but these, as Loomba suggest, represent merely the ‘contradictions imposed upon her by a racist, patriarchal and bourgeouis society,’ which has a clear definition of the woman’s place in the world and any threat to the man’s rule is extinguished by whatever damning basis it may concoct.

Deception Through One Mans Madness - Shakespeare's Hamlet

Deception Through One Mans Madness - Shakespeare's Hamlet

Essay on Othello by William Shakespeare

Othello essay

Audience members will perceive a work differently and be drawn to different aspects of a work in accordance with their educational, societal and cultural backgrounds. The revenge tragedy, ‘Othello’, by William Shakespeare reflects the Elizabethan context and values including the role of fate, the importance of honour and the ability to have an ordered state. It is Shakespeare’s depiction of a tragedy instigated by jealousy and the downfall of a tragic hero, which is pivotal to the drama and action of the play. One way this work may be valued is from a psychoanalytical perspective, by an exploration of Othello’s psyche through the shifting patterns of imagery and Iago’s psyche through the irony in his soliloquies. Another way of perceiving this work is from a feminist perspective explored through the ambiguous presentation of women who are depicted through the eyes of male characters and Emilia’s cynical attitude towards the hypocritical nature of men.

My Journey Through Acting

My Journey Through Acting

How do you see yourself in your body?

Essay on the Character Malcolm from Macbeth

In Shakespeare’s production Macbeth several kings, or kings to be, are introduced: Duncan, Macbeth, Sir Edward the Confessor, and Malcolm. Malcolm although only seventeen, is far superior to the rest. His well-rounded character, words of wisdom and ability to make patient, well thought out decisions proves him the best again and again. With the help of his own personal skills and reputation Malcolm is able to take back the throne that should have been his all along.

Does Macbeth or Lady Macbeth have a Stronger Character?

I believe I am at a crossroads when deciding whether Macbeth or Lady Macbeth has a stronger character. Lady Macbeth shows a strong ambition at the beginning of the play while Macbeth was very indeterminate. Lady Macbeth begins to show weakness as the play goes and Macbeth gains strength. Macbeth lasted longer while bearing the remorse of the murder seeing as Lady Macbeth committed suicide.

Lady Macbeth was very strong willed in the beginning while Macbeth was emotionally fragile. When Macbeth had written Lady Macbeth the letter describing his prophecy that the witches foretold, “All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be King hereafter” (I iii 52). She instantly jumped on the idea planning on murdering Duncan and making her husband king.
“Hie thee hither,
That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;
And chastise with the valour of my tongue,
All that impedes the from the golden round,
Which fate and metaphysical doth seem
To have thee crown’d withal” (I V 23- 28)

Shortly after she reads this letter, she leaks her murderous intent with strong ambition in an aside,
“Come to my woman’s breasts,
And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,

How the Ghost of Hamlet's Father Makes the Tragedy Possible

A Kings Will

The tragedy that is Hamlet is filled with so many unique characters, each with their own quirks that individualize themselves. But one of the least developed, or undeveloped, of all the characters is the one whom makes the entire plot of Hamlet possible. That is the Ghost of Hamlet's father.

This character is very depersonalized, almost to the point of making him a non-character. At the very beginning of the play, Hamlets father is already deceased, leaving the audience to know very little about him as a person. The 'Ghost' as he is referred to in the script, is seen in the first act when he appears before some guards and Horatio, a good friend of Hamlet. Later on, the Ghost comes to Hamlet alone and speaks to him, telling him of how he was secretly murdered by his brother Claudius. He then proceeds to tell Hamlet to exact revenge for him. “Pity me not, but lend thy serious hearing to what I shall unfold”, Hamlets father asks of him before telling him of his death.

Running From the Past as Described in the Plays A Streetcar Named Desire and Babylon Revisted

Running from the Past

The theme of running from the past is prevalent in both plays A Streetcar Named Desire and Babylon Revisited. Charlie Wales the protagonist in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Babylon Revisited is a recovered alcoholic that lived fast and hard before the depression hit. Charlie is faced with his reckless past when he goes to regain custody of his daughter Honoria in Paris, his old playground. Blanche DuBois is also running from her past in Tennessee William’s A Streetcar Named Desire, she lived a sexually perspicuous life, and after she looses the family home she goes to live with her sister Stella and her Husband Stanley Kowalski in New Orleans. Blanche tries to reinvent herself with lies, and illusions, but her past catches up with her as well. Both characters face major guilt from their past actions, and are there fore can not ever escape the consequences of their past.

Music Design in the Ancient Greek Theatre

Music Design in the Ancient Greek Theatre

In my freshman year at Prairie View A&M, I was cast as a musician for the chorus in a production of Medea by Euripides. I was intrigued by the use of music in the play. As I thought about the origin of music design in the Ancient Greek theatre I began to research the subject and encountered a recording of some music designed for the early Greek theatre. The music was directed by Gregorio Paniagua and the pieces that were performed were the Anakrousis, the Orestes Stasimo and the Premiere Hymne: Delphique A Apollon. At first the music resembled something out of an episode of Star Trek, but as I listened I realized that the music designers for Star Trek were following a formula that was set centuries ago. All songs were equal in intensity and character. What I mean by that is the music in Ancient Greek theatre was a character in itself. The songs started out quietly then peaked later on to arouse the listener’s emotions. The instrumentation was scarce but it said a lot coming in only to point a moment out to the audience.

Evil Thoughts Created by Jealousy in Othello and Macbeth

Jealousy in Othello and Macbeth

A parasite is an organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits by acquiring nutrients at the host organism’s expense; some examples of parasites include barnacles and fleas, however, the parasite that will be dealt with shortly is a different kind of monster, for it possesses green-eyes.

Jealousy as a theme is mentioned frequently in William Shakespeare’s plays Othello and Macbeth. However, even more impressively, one can observe that all jealous characters seem to follow the same trend; this is that jealousy evokes an evil in man that, when acted upon, will ultimately lead to the man’s demise. This process is demonstrated through three defined stages: the birth of jealousy, an act of evil, and the character’s own destruction.

Death of a Salesman Discussion

Discussion of Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

Willy Loman is too naïve and superficial to be the hero of a tragedy. To what extent would you agree with this view?

What is a tragic hero?
Willys not a tragic hero- as its someone whose great
Do we feel pity or fear for him (catharsis)?
Flaws in Willy’s character
Views on Biffs occupation
Quotes that support his naivety
The American dream- obsession
Selfless act of dying- brave or foolish
His views on wealth (refer to brother Ben)
How being short of money had impact on his wealth

Willy envisaged a much more successful life for himself, but in reality he was a failure as he tried to attain those unattainable goals. We feel sympathy for his misguided path through life, and disgust for the way he has blindly pursued it, ruining himself and his family in the process.

Willy instilled his sons with the same warped values that have poisoned his own life. In the flashback scenes, when Willy sees his son Biff as a young man, he marvels at his good looks
and popularity, sure that these qualities will equal a remarkable life for Biff.

An Essay on Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett - The Godot Land

Mr. Beckett never fails to keep an appointment with us on the Godot Land, where two tramps are still waiting, on a country road, beneath a tree of crucifixion. Or, nothing happens there. It would be a conventional land, were it not for the fact that it has a cyclical shape of ambiguity and paradox, in all dimensions, spiritual and existential, which renders its landscapes limitless, transcending the specificity imposed by time and space. Where is the Godot Land? Time never tells. Nothing is certain except that it’s Beckett’s legacy to us.

Use of Dramatic Light and Sound in A Streetcar Named Desire

A Streetcar Named Desire

To What Dramatic Effect Does the Playwright Make Use of Light and Sound?

A Streetcar Named Desire is a play written by Tennessee Williams in 1947. Like in many other modern plays, here the playwright makes an extensive use of stage effects: the ideas are expressed not only through words, but also by sound, music and light. They are used to set the context and the mood of the scene – or of the play in general; to implicitly suggest an idea, an action; to show the feelings of a character, and to let the audience into his/her mind. None of these effects are eye-candy-like props, but real dramatic devices that are indispensable for the spectator to fully appreciate all the dimensions of the play.

Syndicate content