Poems

A Poison Tree - A William Blake Piece

A Poison Tree - A William Blake Piece

William Blake was an English poet who was born in eighteen century, the Renaissance period. He had an inherent talent of making art works, mostly engravings. William was raised in a strong Christian family, thus, had made him ardently worship to God. As being an artist, he was susceptible to everything in his daily life. Every tree and bush could be an inspiration of his next work. A Poison Tree, which was written in 1794, was one of his literary productions. In this poem, the poet illustrates the seriousness of growing hatred from a foe and the innermost struggle held during the critical time period.

The Cruelty of Children: Alden Nowlen’s Poem Child of Tabu

The Cruelty of Children: Alden Nowlen’s Poem Child of Tabu

Children can be so cruel. How often have we heard this sentiment expressed and there is the rare person who does not harbour some dark memory of personal experience with this kind of cruelty? Alden Nowlan’s poem “Child of Tabu” expresses this sentiment, but it goes a step farther. The poem not only reveals the cruelty that children can carry out, it explores the roots of this cruelty and finds them embedded in the culture and practice of the children’s parents and the world that these children have grown up in.

Nowlan captures the casual cruelty of children and the power they discover when they “pick” on another child. In the first stanza we are presented with an image of a child surrounded by taunting children who have “found” that they “could make him weep” (1). Nowlan captures the unity the children experience as they join together in cruelty by isolating a simple gesture, the “wink” the children share as they experience the thrill of the power their cruelty gives them. Nowlan’s simple language and unadorned images projects the starkness and simplicity of this familiar scene.

Explication of Edmund Spenser’s Sonnet 64

Explication of Edmund Spenser’s Sonnet 64

The speaker of Edmund Spenser’s Sonnet 64 is a man speaking of his beloved and delighting in the scents in the atmosphere exuded from her while they are kissing. This sonnet is arranged in the English Spenserian format, with a rhyme scheme of abab bcbc cdcd ee. The first quatrain sets the tone of the sonnet, which is blissful, and is then followed by two quatrains that compare the beloved’s different body parts, scents, and features to various plants and flowers and their “odours” and colors. A turn comes in the couplet at the end as the speaker realizes that, not only does his lover’s scents compare to those of the flowers, but that the flowers’ scents are far “excelled” by his beloved’s. Like the vertical layout of the poem, the descriptions of the beloved’s features and scents are illustrated in a vertical manner as the speaker begins with his beloved’s face and works his way down her torso. Additionally, most lines in this sonnet are end-stopped, emphasizing the rhyme and giving pause as the reader considers each simile given by the speaker.

Comparing and Contrasting the Poems Anyone Lived in a Pretty How Town Written By E. E. Cummings and Romeo and Juliet Written By William Shakespeare

Comparing and Contrasting the Poems Anyone Lived in a Pretty How Town Written By E. E. Cummings and Romeo and Juliet Written By William Shakespeare

Throughout time love has conquered all, in these two stories love is the cause of death and despair, but in the end love is the reason for two couples to prove that without love there is no life. “Anyone Lived in a Pretty How Town” is a poem about two lovers that have been made outcast by their town from unacceptable social joining in their union. On the other hand, “Romeo and Juliet” are of the same category but it is not only the town but their families are repulsed by the thought of their affair. Two tales of forbidden love, one rejected by family the other ignored by the town’s people, both brought together by tragedy only to remain side by side in their deaths.

Applying Freudian Concepts to the Poem The Heart Seeks Pleasure First by Emily Dickinson

Applying Freudian Concepts to the Poem The Heart Seeks Pleasure First by Emily Dickinson

The purpose of this paper is to apply Freudian concepts to a particular poem, in this case Emily Dickinson's "The Heart Seeks Pleasure - First -." The hope is to attain a greater understanding not only of the obvious meanings but also to study whatever unconscious motives Dickinson may have had as well. Using psychoanalytic theory provides a platform with which to ask questions that seek answers not so much as from the words on the page but more from what is behind the words on the page.

Love is a Losing Game - Elizabeth Bishop's Poem "One Art"

Love is a Losing Game - Elizabeth Bishop's Poem "One Art"

The definition of losing is not only applied to material items, but it also conveys the feelings of abandonment, departure and rejection that one person can leave in another person’s life. Losing is an inevitable part of life. So many things get lost in an individual’s life. Elizabeth Bishop voiced the sentiment of loss love throughout her poetry. A perfect palpable example is Bishop’s poem “One Art”. In “One Art” Bishop flawlessly describes the sentiment of loss people suffer when losing a loved one. The losing could be death or simply abandonment; it is never accurately explained. All throughout the poem Bishop describe losing unimportant things, such as material ones or those that do not truly belong to a person, with a sense for acceptance. Bishop utters the sentiment of loss in the poem “One Art” through illogical argumentation, false acceptance and denial as well with the help of figurative languages.

Analysis of Blackberry Picking Poem by Seamus Heaney

Blackberry Picking – A Seemingly Unimportant Event

In Seamus Heaney’s poem “Blackberry Picking” he vividly recreates a seemingly unimportant event in which he goes blackberry picking. However by the end of the poem this experience acquires increased significance. Throughout Heaney’s description of this event we are made aware of the theme, Heaney’s childish hopes and dreams in contrast to the harsh realities of life. This theme is effectively conveyed through the mood of excitement and anticipation in the first stanza while picking the berries which transforms into an atmosphere of disappointment and regret in the second stanza as the children’s berries have rotted. Heaney is able to develop this supposed insignificant event using techniques such as word-choice, sentence structure, imagery, contrast and tone.

Henry Vaughan - The Retreat

Henry Vaughan - The Retreat

This poem dramatizes the conflict between the growing age and the hope to return back.

In this poem, Henry Vaughan presents a speaker, who uses metaphysical. Vaughan wants to retreat back to his childhood, which can be read as an escape of the corrupt adult world. While, on the other hand, Vaughan celebrates his perfect soul, before it "sinned." In lines 3-4, he says, "Before I understood this place / Appointed for my second race." This could not only mean a childhood state of innocence and ignorance, but his pre-conceived soul--a kind of Garden of Eden pre-fall state of grace.

It would seem in Christian theology that the best way for a grown man to attain heavenly perfection is to die and ascend to heaven, moving forward in age. But, Vaughan wants to go backward, to negate all his past sin and be washed clean from the start. Some men a forward motion love, But I by backward steps would move and when this dust falls to the urn, In that state I came, return.

Overall, Vaughan refutes the temporal and carnal. He champions his soul above the mind.

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