Philosophy

Paying a Price for Free Criticism: Prostitutes Perceived for Their Occupation

Paying a Price for Free Criticism: Prostitutes Perceived for Their Occupation

When I thought about prostitutes, I used to think about a video playing the romantic rock music from the ‘80s with a pretty woman being stalked by the singer in a fancy car. However, when you ask others to think about a prostitute, they would probably assume that they are “nobodies” or have no cares about life and anyone else. Another vision of a prostitute that used to come to my mind was a teenager that had dark-red lipstick on with torn clothes while smoking a cigarette. Nevertheless, the true identity of a prostitute almost never comes to our minds. Do we ever put ourselves in their high heels and try to understand why they are doing such a job? The truth is that prostitutes are judged according to their occupation rather than for the person they really are in the inside!

There is Philosophy in Child Development

There is Philosophy in Child Development

The famous 5th century, Athenian, Philosopher: Socrates stated "the unexamined life is not worth living." After taking the course Philosophy 115: Philosophy of Human Person I would explain the definition of “life” in a Philosophical sense as being a combination of philosophical ideas such as morality, respect, free-will and scientific issues. The study of philosophy is a very complex and complicated task.
There are so many different questions on many different topics and philosophy tries to explain them all. It tries to provide answers to the many questions that science and religion cannot explain. And from this it urges one to think about issues that may otherwise be ignored. Thus one must strive as Socrates states to examine life otherwise life is not worth living.

Illusion vs Reality Paper

Illusion vs Reality Paper

The world around us is filled with both thin and thick illusions, the things our minds see that are not what they appear to be. The questions that we are fast with in a world full of thck and thin illusions are what is real, and is this world that we exist in real or only a thick illusion? The answer is that this world is reality however.

Romeo and Juliet in Aristotle’s Mind

Romeo and Juliet in Aristotle’s Mind

In the story of Romeo and Juliet, we know that the basic plot consists of love and sacrifice. In the beginning of the story, Romeo falls in love with Juliet at first sight and then marries her in less than twenty-four hours. Our lovers then go through a period of trials due to loving a member of your family’s enemy. Romeo is exiled to Mantua due to killing Tybalt and the Capulets are forcing Juliet to marry to a suitor named Paris. In the end, both Romeo and Juliet killed each other because they swore that if one of passes away, then they will die with them. However, this seemingly simple storyline of Romeo and Juliet is actually based on one of Aristotle’s theatrical philosophy.

The Power of Knowledge in Plato’s Protagoras

The Power of Knowledge in Plato’s Protagoras

Does Socrates Hold Contradictory Positions On Civil Disobedience?

Does Socrates Hold Contradictory Positions On Civil Disobedience?

In Plato’s Apology and Crito, there is an apparent contradiction between each dialogue’s representation of Socrates’ position on civil disobedience. Gary Young represents Socrates’ contradictory positions this way:
(I) I shall not give up philosophy, even if the city commands me to do so. (Ap.29d)

(II) Every citizen (including myself) should obey every command of the city. (Cr. 50a-53 a)

Young then claims that the contradiction has been typically dealt with in one of two ways.
(1) The contradiction between (I) and (II) is merely verbal or apparent; that is, Socrates is not really contradicting himself in asserting (I) and (II), because he has in mind a qualification of either (I) or (II) [usually (II) is picked for this role], which has the effect of limiting the applicability of (I) to one set of cases, and the applicability of (II) to a wholly different set of cases, so that (I) and (II) could never both apply to the same situation.

The Trials of the Noble Savage as Mentioned by Rousseau

The Trials of the Noble Savage

To analyze society and its effects on human life is common among writers, and Shakespeare is no exception. In Hamlet, Shakespeare often comments on the decay that the Danish society is facing, but could he be saying more than just this? Could be he saying that not only is something “rotten in the state of Denmark”, but in all states (I, iv, 90)? From his play, the conclusion can be drawn that human beings are, by nature, good; however, the conditions and expectations that society put on them cause them to be evil. Three of characters from Hamlet demonstrate this point with particular power, those characters being Claudius, Gertrude, and Ophelia.

Short Essay on the Death of Socrates

Short Essay on the Death of Socrates

Upon being put on trial for corrupting of youth of Athens and “not believing in the gods of the state”, Socrates is sentenced to death for his wrongdoings. Socrates was viewed as “gadfly” to the city of Athens, and after a lifetime of “gadfly”-ing, many people of power in the city had had enough. Socrates’ views on many points of Athenian culture differed from the norm, and with every person he could connect with, the powers of Athens were further undermined. While the Law of Athens was manipulated to ultimately end Socrates’ life, he still, like many before him, had an option that could enable him to circumvent his demise. The Law of Athens was twisted to work against Socrates, and Socrates could manipulate it once more to save himself by paying the right Athenians who could organize his escape. Money was no issue; many of Socrates’ followers offered to put up the necessary coin for him to slip away. So all Socrates had to do was accept his friends’ offers and he could be a free man to continue his legacy elsewhere—Thessaly was suggested by Crito. Socrates’ politely declined the offers and ended up swallowing the hemlock.

Paper on Rene Descartes - French Philosopher, Mathematician and Physician

Paper on René Descartes - French Philosopher, Mathematician and Physician

René Descartes (also known by his Latin name “Renatus Cartesius”) was a French philosopher, mathematician and physician. He was known not only by his revolutionary work in science and philosophy but also in math, creating the analytic geometry, becoming one of the key figures of the Scientific Revolution. Descartes is called the creator of modern Philosophy, as well as modern Mathematics, considered one of the most influent and important figures of the History of West Thought. He inspired contemporaries and many generations of philosophers that came after him. Great part of the philosophy that was wrote after Descartes, was a reaction to his work or to the work of authors influenced by him. Many historians also say that from Descartes, the Modern Age Rationalism was created. The philosopher lived in an epoch marked by religious wars between Protestants and Catholics. He travelled a lot and saw that societies have different, and many times contradictory, beliefs.

Comparing and Contrasting of Plato and Nietzsche Paper

Comparing and Contrasting of Plato and Nietzsche

Plato and Nietzsche are two of the worlds greatest and well known philosophers of their times. Plato’s Symposium is based of a series of speeches on love, purpose and the total sense of being. Each of the speeches, are made up of seven different men attending a party and each of the men expresses a speech about love. Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, is more a philosophical novel instead of a dialogue like Plato’s Symposium. Nietzsche’s writing is more of a profound understanding of purpose and morality. Nietzsche talks about mankind being the step before reaching the “overman.” Nietzsche then talks about the “overman” being free from all discriminations and moralities in that the “overman” constructs his own values and purpose (SparkNotes Editors, Summary).

Socrates' Eros Essay

Socrates’ Eros

What is Eros? It is the ancient Greek word for love. Rephrasing the question, we see the classic question put forward by philosophers, artists and heartbroken couples, what love is. From ancient to modern time, love as an important part of humanity attracts humans to explore its essence. Long marching through discovering continuously renews people’s cognition of love. Is love beautiful? Is love ugly? Moreover, is love somewhere between them, and is “just average-looking”? Unlike soul’s immortality, love is spirit which is immortal and mortal. Socrates introduced a paramount concept of being “in-between” in logic to describe love. What will this “in-between” concept bring to the ancient Greek philosophy? And what is the soundness in the existence of being mortal and immortal? It all dates back to the time in the Symposium.

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